How to Say Have a Good Day in Spanish: 6 Most Common Phrases

Woman waving to illustrate she know how to say have a good day in spanish

In Latin America and Spain, expressing good wishes for someone’s day is a common practice. While “Have a good day” is a simple phrase, Spanish offers a rich variety of expressions to convey goodwill.

From the familiar “buen día” to the more affectionate “que tengas un buen día” or “tenga un buen día,” these phrases vary in formality and are influenced by regional and cultural settings.

In this article, we’ll explore the most common ways to wish someone well, from the formal to the casual, enabling you to spread positivity and good vibes, regardless of whether you’re conversing with a single person or a group.

So, por favor!

Join us in learning Spanish expressions for wishing others a “lindo día,” and let’s delve into the art of saying “Have a good day” in the Spanish language.

Are you ready?

Let’s Start!

How to say Have a good day in Spanish: 6 Most common ways

Group of women waving their hands and wishing you a good day in Spanish

1. Que te vaya bien

“Que te vaya bien” is a Spanish phrase that translates to “I hope everything goes well for you” or “May things go well for you” in English.

Example:

“Te deseo mucha suerte en tu entrevista de trabajo. ¡Que te vaya bien!”

(Translation: “I wish you good luck in your job interview. May things go well for you!”)

2. Buen día

The literal translation to “Buen día” is “Good day” or “Good morning” in English. It’s a friendly and common greeting used in Spanish-speaking regions to wish someone a feliz día or good day, typically in the morning or early part of the day.

Example:

Person A: “Buen día, ¿cómo estás?”

(Translation: “Good day, how are you?”)

Person B: “¡Buen día! Estoy muy bien, gracias.”

(Translation: “Good morning! I’m very well, thank you.”)

3. Que le vaya bien or qué les vaya bien?

“Que le vaya bien” is a polite and formal expression that translates to “I hope everything goes well for you” or “May things go well for you” in English. But you can only use it to address one person.

Qué les vaya bien is used when addressing more than one person.

They’re both used to convey well-wishes and good luck in a formal or respectful manner.

Example:

Person A: “Me temo que debo irme ahora. Gracias por su ayuda.”

(Translation: “I’m afraid I have to leave now. Thank you for your help.”)

Person B: “No hay problema. Que le vaya bien en sus actividades de hoy.”

(Translation: “No problem. I hope everything goes well for you in your activities today.”)

4. Que tengas buen día

“Que tengas un buen día” translates to “Have a good day” or “Wishing you a good day” in English. It is a common and friendly way to wish someone a pleasant or good day.

This expression is often used in casual and familiar interactions.

Example:

Person A: “¡Hola! Voy a salir a dar un paseo por el parque.”

(Translation: “Hi! I’m going for a walk in the park.”)

Person B: “¡Qué bien! ¡Que tengas un buen día en el parque!”

(Translation: “That’s great! Have a good day in the park!”)

5. Que tengas bonito día

“Que tengas bonito día” is a Spanish phrase that translates to “Have a nice day” or “Wishing you a beautiful day” in English.

It’s a friendly and slightly more affectionate way to wish someone a pleasant and lovely day. This expression is often used in casual and familiar interactions.

Example:

Person A: “Hoy es mi cumpleaños, ¡voy a celebrar con mis amigos!” (Translation: “Today is my birthday, I’m going to celebrate with my friends!”)

Person B: “¡Feliz cumpleaños! ¡Que tengas un bonito día lleno de alegría y risas!” (Translation: “Happy birthday! I hope you have a nice day filled with joy and laughter!”)

6. Qué te vaya bien

“Que te vaya bien” means “I hope everything goes well for you” or “May things go well for you” in English. It’s a friendly way to convey well wishes and wish someone good luck before they depart.

Example:

Person A: “Me voy a una entrevista de trabajo. Espero que todo salga bien.” (Translation: “I’m heading to a job interview. I hope everything goes well.”)

Person B: “¡Claro! Que te vaya bien. ¡Estoy seguro de que lo harás genial!” (Translation: “Of course! I hope everything goes well for you. I’m sure you’ll do great!”)

Final Words on How to Say Have a Good Day in Spanish

Asian lady using her hand to greet and wish people a good day in Spanish.

In the world of language and culture, the ways we wish each other well can be a reflection of our warmth and camaraderie toward others.

Keep in mind:

In the Spanish-speaking world, the art of saying “Have a good day” is a good skill to possess. Whether it’s the formal “que tenga un buen día” or the casual “hasta pronto,” these expressions reflect the beauty of connection and shared good wishes.

Not only that:

Understanding and using these phrases can enrich your interactions with Spanish speakers and provide a glimpse into the rich diversity of the language. By embracing these common and not-so-common expressions, you have the power to brighten someone’s day in a way that’s uniquely Spanish.

So, as we bid you “hasta luego” and wish you “que tengas un buen día,” we hope you’ll carry the spirit of these phrases into your conversations, wherever your language journey may take you.

Ask yourself this question:

What could be more precious than spreading positivity and goodwill, one phrase at a time? ¡Muchas gracias for joining us in this exploration of the art of saying “Have a Good Day” in Spanish!

Happy Learning!

Are you looking for an engaging and unique way to learn Spanish and dramatically improve your conversational Spanish?   

I have some good news: You can get a hold of me on my website at www.byondlanguage.com to learn about my special language learning method that emphasizes good habits and lifestyle over grammar.

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Since he was a child, Daniel has been passionate about Social Dynamics. Learn how Daniel got his start as a Language Coach, and why he decided to start this language blog. If you want to send Daniel a quick message, then visit his contact page here.

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